To Mrs Reynolds' Cat

The poets of the romanticism movement.
capital r.

The same tenderness and sensibility, the same strain of moral reflection, and the same enthusiastic love of nature, pervade all her effusions.
It appears also as if the wounded feelings of Charlotte Smith had found relief and consolation, during her latter years, in an accurate observation not only of the beautiful effect produced by the endless diversity of natural objects but also in a careful study of their scientific arrangement, and their more minute variations.
  - The Monthly Review on Charlotte Smith
Admired by Wordsworth, frowned upon by critics, and vastly underrated in her lifetime. It’s a shame how the female Romantics seem to disappear in history. A very, very melancholy poet.
mirroir:

The inscription on Keats’ tombstone.

mirroir:

The inscription on Keats’ tombstone.

(Source: invisiblestories, via vanian)

paperphilia:

mythologyofblue:


Samuel Taylor Coleridge: ‘Lakes’ NotebookA map from one of Coleridge’s notebooks kept between July and September 1802, recording his solitary exploration of the mountainous landscape of the Lake District.Samuel Taylor Coleridge, ‘Lakes’ Notebook, 1802 © The British Library Board
 — at The British Library.

(myimaginarybrooklyn)

Coleridge’s Moleskine.

paperphilia:

mythologyofblue:

Samuel Taylor Coleridge: ‘Lakes’ Notebook

A map from one of Coleridge’s notebooks kept between July and September 1802, recording his solitary exploration of the mountainous landscape of the Lake District.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, ‘Lakes’ Notebook, 1802 
© The British Library Board

(myimaginarybrooklyn)

Coleridge’s Moleskine.

(via fuckyeahmanuscripts)

'Modern biography shows clearly that, in his own time, Shelley was famous or rather notorious for his views on political revolution, republicanism„ wars of independence, atheism, and philosophical skepticism…
       He campaigned for workers’ societies and universal suffrage at home and also supported liberation movements in Ireland, Spain, Italy, Mexico and Greece. All these ideas deeply affected his poetry.’
- The Folio Poets: Shelley (Most beautiful book I own)
I think a lot of the difficulty of Shelley comes from this. He was intensely revolutionary and tried incredibly hard to make his point, but he was always trapped in this very upper class position, and since he was expelled and essentially disowned by his family he found himself stuck; too distant from the working classes to inspire them personally, despite his best efforts, but too radical to remain a part of the upper class culture he was born into.
Because of this I think Shelley gradually began to pour his radicalism more into his writing in a less direct manner, producing something less opaquely topical but more timeless, and eventually I reckon that’s what produced things like Prometheus Unbound. A chained protagonist, lamenting the state of the world around him, a harbinger of knowledge who doesn’t bring about change personally, but inspires it. I think Prometheus might have been a big deal to Shelley.
But what do I know?

Poetry advice from Keats, to Shelley

You I am sure will forgive me for sincerely remarking that you might curb your magnanimity and be more of an artist, and ‘load every rift’ of your subject with ore. The thought of such discipline must fall like cold chains upon you, who perhaps never sat with your wings furl’d for six months together.

-The Letters of Percy Bysshe Shelley Volume II


(Percy please, stop pissing off the government)

“If by dull rhymes our English must be chain’d,
And, like Andromeda, the Sonnet sweet
Fetter’d, in spite of pained loveliness;
Let us find out, if we must be constrain’d,
Sandals more interwoven and complete
To fit the naked foot of poesy;
Let us inspect the lyre, and weigh the stress
Of every chord, and see what may be gain’d
By ear industrious, and attention meet:
Misers of sound and syllable, no less
Than Midas of his coinage, let us be
Jealous of dead leaves in the bay wreath crown;
So, if we may not let the Muse be free,
She will be bound with garlands of her own.”

—   John Keats | On the Sonnet (via keatsthepoet)

(Source: )

"The great writers of our own age are, we have reason to suppose, the companions and forerunners of some unimagined change in our social condition or the opinions which cement it. The cloud of mind is discharging its collected lightning, and the equilibrium between institutions and opinions is now restoring, or is about to be restored.”

Percy Bysshe Shelley, Prometheus Unbound, Preface

thingsthatarenormal:

From the Shelley’s Ghost exhibit at the NYPL. Continuation from a painting entitled “Shelley & His Circle: The Last Days In Italy.”

thingsthatarenormal:

From the Shelley’s Ghost exhibit at the NYPL. Continuation from a painting entitled “Shelley & His Circle: The Last Days In Italy.”

(Source: , via fuckyeahshelley)

“I was then and afterwards pleased and surprised at Byron’s passiveness and docility in listening to Shelley — but all who heard him felt the charm of his simple, earnest manner ; while Byron knew him to be exempt from the egotism, pedantry, coxcombry, and, more than all, the rivalry of authorship, and that he was the truest and most discriminating of his admirers.”

—   Edward John Trelawny (via book-of-flights)

(via the-deserts-of-dorne)